Discussion:
Casio Wave Ceptor wrist watch - quick accuracy test
(too old to reply)
Esa Heikkinen
2018-06-11 08:20:06 UTC
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Raw Message
Hi!

There seems to be some kind of comeback going on with 80's style digital
watches. You may find replicas of some 80's models or even re-makes of
the original models from original manufacturer.

So I decided to get one. As a time-nut my primary goal was to have radio
controlled 'atomic' model. So I ended up to Casio Wave Ceptor
WV-59DE-1AVEF. There's many models available from basic digital models
like this to very nice ones with with full titanium body (analog style).
But because of the 80's is hot it had to be digital...

Wave Ceptors suport all time signals formats (US, UK/German and Japan)
and correct standard is automatically selected when home city is set.

One of the first things to do was to test the accuracy with radio
syncronization turned off. Correct time was fist set with DCF77. Then I
switched off the synconization. After beign about three days off there
was no significiant visible error on time. In the video we can see
however about one frame error, which means about 40 milliseconds. Still
that's pretty good result for wrist watch. Also, the syncronization will
occur once per day when the reception is good.

So the watch must be at least calibrated in the factory. Don't know if
the watch performs any kind of self-calibration according to radio
syncronization results, most likely not - but it would be technically
possible.

So far so good, it's accurate enough - at least as new. When
syncronization is turned on, there should never be visible error on time.

Here's my test video:

--
73s!
Esa
OH4KJU
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Dana Whitlow
2018-06-11 10:30:20 UTC
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I bought a Casio 'atomic watch" about 3 months ago, one which uses the
'3405' module.
I've also been running checks with radio setting turned off, and mine is
coming in at
just under 1 sec per month, based on seeing how long it takes to drift one
second.

But I find that visual/aural coordination is a poor way to do business- if
the error is near
zero (or an integer number of seconds), my eye/ear/brain will shift to make
it look like
it's "right on" within a few seconds even if the initial look says it's a
little bit off.

I hadn't thought of the video approach- sure wish I had a means to record
video and
then view it frame by frame.

Dana
Post by Esa Heikkinen
Hi!
There seems to be some kind of comeback going on with 80's style digital
watches. You may find replicas of some 80's models or even re-makes of the
original models from original manufacturer.
So I decided to get one. As a time-nut my primary goal was to have radio
controlled 'atomic' model. So I ended up to Casio Wave Ceptor
WV-59DE-1AVEF. There's many models available from basic digital models like
this to very nice ones with with full titanium body (analog style). But
because of the 80's is hot it had to be digital...
Wave Ceptors suport all time signals formats (US, UK/German and Japan) and
correct standard is automatically selected when home city is set.
One of the first things to do was to test the accuracy with radio
syncronization turned off. Correct time was fist set with DCF77. Then I
switched off the synconization. After beign about three days off there was
no significiant visible error on time. In the video we can see however
about one frame error, which means about 40 milliseconds. Still that's
pretty good result for wrist watch. Also, the syncronization will occur
once per day when the reception is good.
So the watch must be at least calibrated in the factory. Don't know if the
watch performs any kind of self-calibration according to radio
syncronization results, most likely not - but it would be technically
possible.
So far so good, it's accurate enough - at least as new. When
syncronization is turned on, there should never be visible error on time.
http://youtu.be/_A23buFeHd0
--
73s!
Esa
OH4KJU
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David G. McGaw
2018-06-11 19:44:12 UTC
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I think you guys won the luck of the draw.  I have had a Casio
WV200DA-1AV Wave Ceptor for a while, module 3140.  Nice watch, but it
gains about 1/2 sec per day when not synchronized.  I recently got a
Casio GW-M5610 G-Shock, module 3153.  I have not run it unsychronized,
so have not checked its drift, but other G-Shocks have been quite good. 
It is the higher-end line with tighter specs and they actually have a
trimmer inside.

David N1HAC
Post by Dana Whitlow
I bought a Casio 'atomic watch" about 3 months ago, one which uses the
'3405' module.
I've also been running checks with radio setting turned off, and mine is
coming in at
just under 1 sec per month, based on seeing how long it takes to drift one
second.
But I find that visual/aural coordination is a poor way to do business- if
the error is near
zero (or an integer number of seconds), my eye/ear/brain will shift to make
it look like
it's "right on" within a few seconds even if the initial look says it's a
little bit off.
I hadn't thought of the video approach- sure wish I had a means to record
video and
then view it frame by frame.
Dana
Post by Esa Heikkinen
Hi!
There seems to be some kind of comeback going on with 80's style digital
watches. You may find replicas of some 80's models or even re-makes of the
original models from original manufacturer.
So I decided to get one. As a time-nut my primary goal was to have radio
controlled 'atomic' model. So I ended up to Casio Wave Ceptor
WV-59DE-1AVEF. There's many models available from basic digital models like
this to very nice ones with with full titanium body (analog style). But
because of the 80's is hot it had to be digital...
Wave Ceptors suport all time signals formats (US, UK/German and Japan) and
correct standard is automatically selected when home city is set.
One of the first things to do was to test the accuracy with radio
syncronization turned off. Correct time was fist set with DCF77. Then I
switched off the synconization. After beign about three days off there was
no significiant visible error on time. In the video we can see however
about one frame error, which means about 40 milliseconds. Still that's
pretty good result for wrist watch. Also, the syncronization will occur
once per day when the reception is good.
So the watch must be at least calibrated in the factory. Don't know if the
watch performs any kind of self-calibration according to radio
syncronization results, most likely not - but it would be technically
possible.
So far so good, it's accurate enough - at least as new. When
syncronization is turned on, there should never be visible error on time.
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D_A23buFeHd0&data=02%7C01%7Cdavid.g.mcgaw%40dartmouth.edu%7Ca8e76ed2d4b54ed75dce08d5cf866ee5%7C995b093648d640e5a31ebf689ec9446f%7C0%7C0%7C636643098739784325&sdata=EH0F8vRQK0jmROrREGrD9jDMcd2JQglutxZO%2BVff7t0%3D&reserved=0
--
73s!
Esa
OH4KJU
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Dana Whitlow
2018-06-11 23:05:58 UTC
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I should have mentioned that my Casio (module 3405) is a G-Shock "diving
watch" with a 20-bar
(~200m depth) rating. In so far as possible, I never take it off my wrist
(TSA check points being the
occasional exception), and don't want any leak problems even though I never
dive.

I once bought a watch rated at 20m, and it only lasted about a month before
it leaked. Apparently
normal living stresses are equivalent to diving to moderate to substantial
depths.

Dana
I think you guys won the luck of the draw. I have had a Casio WV200DA-1AV
Wave Ceptor for a while, module 3140. Nice watch, but it gains about 1/2
sec per day when not synchronized. I recently got a Casio GW-M5610
G-Shock, module 3153. I have not run it unsychronized, so have not checked
its drift, but other G-Shocks have been quite good. It is the higher-end
line with tighter specs and they actually have a trimmer inside.
David N1HAC
Post by Dana Whitlow
I bought a Casio 'atomic watch" about 3 months ago, one which uses the
'3405' module.
I've also been running checks with radio setting turned off, and mine is
coming in at
just under 1 sec per month, based on seeing how long it takes to drift one
second.
But I find that visual/aural coordination is a poor way to do business- if
the error is near
zero (or an integer number of seconds), my eye/ear/brain will shift to make
it look like
it's "right on" within a few seconds even if the initial look says it's a
little bit off.
I hadn't thought of the video approach- sure wish I had a means to record
video and
then view it frame by frame.
Dana
Hi!
Post by Esa Heikkinen
There seems to be some kind of comeback going on with 80's style digital
watches. You may find replicas of some 80's models or even re-makes of the
original models from original manufacturer.
So I decided to get one. As a time-nut my primary goal was to have radio
controlled 'atomic' model. So I ended up to Casio Wave Ceptor
WV-59DE-1AVEF. There's many models available from basic digital models like
this to very nice ones with with full titanium body (analog style). But
because of the 80's is hot it had to be digital...
Wave Ceptors suport all time signals formats (US, UK/German and Japan) and
correct standard is automatically selected when home city is set.
One of the first things to do was to test the accuracy with radio
syncronization turned off. Correct time was fist set with DCF77. Then I
switched off the synconization. After beign about three days off there was
no significiant visible error on time. In the video we can see however
about one frame error, which means about 40 milliseconds. Still that's
pretty good result for wrist watch. Also, the syncronization will occur
once per day when the reception is good.
So the watch must be at least calibrated in the factory. Don't know if the
watch performs any kind of self-calibration according to radio
syncronization results, most likely not - but it would be technically
possible.
So far so good, it's accurate enough - at least as new. When
syncronization is turned on, there should never be visible error on time.
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%
2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D_A23buFeHd0&data=02%
7C01%7Cdavid.g.mcgaw%40dartmouth.edu%7Ca8e76ed2d4b54ed75dce0
8d5cf866ee5%7C995b093648d640e5a31ebf689ec9446f%7C0%7C0%7C636
643098739784325&sdata=EH0F8vRQK0jmROrREGrD9jDMcd2JQglutxZO%
2BVff7t0%3D&reserved=0
--
73s!
Esa
OH4KJU
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Jim Palfreyman
2018-06-11 23:30:25 UTC
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I posted about my G-shock watch on this forum probably about 10 years ago.
Go look them up. I found mine superbly accurate and being in Tasmania I
cannot connect to any LF service. After a while it started to get a little
worse and I found you can take the back off and calibrate it.

My rechargeable battery has just started to fail and so I've ordered a new
one.

Jim
Post by Esa Heikkinen
Hi!
There seems to be some kind of comeback going on with 80's style digital
watches. You may find replicas of some 80's models or even re-makes of
the original models from original manufacturer.
So I decided to get one. As a time-nut my primary goal was to have radio
controlled 'atomic' model. So I ended up to Casio Wave Ceptor
WV-59DE-1AVEF. There's many models available from basic digital models
like this to very nice ones with with full titanium body (analog style).
But because of the 80's is hot it had to be digital...
Wave Ceptors suport all time signals formats (US, UK/German and Japan)
and correct standard is automatically selected when home city is set.
One of the first things to do was to test the accuracy with radio
syncronization turned off. Correct time was fist set with DCF77. Then I
switched off the synconization. After beign about three days off there
was no significiant visible error on time. In the video we can see
however about one frame error, which means about 40 milliseconds. Still
that's pretty good result for wrist watch. Also, the syncronization will
occur once per day when the reception is good.
So the watch must be at least calibrated in the factory. Don't know if
the watch performs any kind of self-calibration according to radio
syncronization results, most likely not - but it would be technically
possible.
So far so good, it's accurate enough - at least as new. When
syncronization is turned on, there should never be visible error on time.
http://youtu.be/_A23buFeHd0
--
73s!
Esa
OH4KJU
_______________________________________________
To unsubscribe, go to
https://www.febo.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts
and follow the instructions there.
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